>Classics & Religious Studies
 

JOHN D. TURNER

Cotner Professor of Religious Studies 
Charles J. Mach University Professor of Classics and History 
 
 
 
 

Department of Classics and Religious Studies 
238 Andrews Hall 
Lincoln, Nebraska 
University of Nebraska-Lincoln 68588-0337 

Voice: (402) 472-7008 
FAX: (402) 472-9771 
E-Mail: jturner2@unl.edu
 

                

Education


Professional History


Some Memberships and Offices held


Interests

My principal areas of interest are biblical studies, especially New Testament; Hellenistic and Graeco-Roman religion and philosophy; Gnosticism; later Platonism and Neoplatonism; and Coptic language and literature.


Teaching

At Nebraska, I regularly teach courses in Religious Studies:
    Ways of Western Religion [CLAS/RELG 206G],
    Early Christianity [CLAS/HIST/RELG 307/807],
    Comparative Religion [CLAS/HIST/RELG 308],
    Religions and Philosophies of Late Antiquity [CLAS/HIST/RELG 409/809],
    Gnosticism[CLAS/RELG 410/810];
and in Classical Greek:
    Plato[GREK 372],
    Seminar in Greek Philosophical Prose [GREK 961/2];
 and in Biblical languages:
    New Testament Greek [GREK 373],
    Introduction to Coptic [CLAS 300E].


Publications:

A few of my more important publications are:

A. My dissertation:

B. English Translations and Introductions of various treatises from the Nag Hammadi Codices discovered in Egypt, December 1945:

"The Book of Thomas the Contender," "The Interpretation of Knowledge," "A Valentinian Exposition," "Allogenes," "Hypsiphrone," and "The Trimorphic Protennoia," in The Nag Hammadi Library in English (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1977; paperback edition 1984; San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1977, paperback edition 1981); third, completely revised edition, R. Smith and J. M. Robinson, eds. (San Francisco: Harper & Row and E. J. Brill, 1988; paperback edition San Francisco: HarperCollins, 1990; unaltered fourth revised edition, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1996).


From Codex II:


From Codex VII:


From Codex VIII:


From Codex X:


From Codex XI:


From Codex XIII:


Critical text editions:

C.  Books and articles dealing mostly with the relation between Gnosticism and Platonism, and with the nature of a religious movement of the first three centuries CE, known as "Gnostic Sethianism":